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The student’s guide to keeping New Year’s resolutions

As 2019 gets into full swing, many people decide to make a change. However, according to the University of Scranton, only 8 percent of people are successful in keeping their resolutions. Here are a few popular student New Year’s resolutions and tips to help you keep on track toward a new you.

According to the National Bipolar Association, simple tasks like meditating and taking a bubble bath are great ways to practice self-care. Photo courtesy of Ally Analore/Connect.

According to the National Bipolar Association, simple tasks like meditating and taking a bubble bath are great ways to practice self-care. Photo courtesy of Ally Analore/Connect.

  1. Becoming More Organized

Being in college forces us to take on many responsibilities at once. One of the main issues students have is finding the time to stay organized. Organization plays a major role in becoming successful, but many students don’t adhere to this tip.

Over time, the will to keep things organized becomes a burden and old habits come back. Try buying a planner or a wall calendar that you can update easily. You can also have friends join in to make the process more exciting and to have someone keep you on track.

  1. Exercising

Many students, along with most of the general population, make a resolution to exercise more often. According to a survey of over 2000 people conducted by Inc.com, exercise and eating healthier are among the top 10 resolutions of 2019. People who make this resolution start the year off strong with good intentions, but, as the year goes on, less and less continue their routine according to Pacific Standard Magazine.

“I want to start going to the gym more to get more fit. Although, I don’t work out much,” junior Mary Fish said.

“I want to get into the graphic design program, go to the gym regularly and eat less dairy, although I ate three mini ice cream cups the other day,” sophomore Charlene Hall said.

If you are having trouble motivating yourself, pick a gym near school or your office, leave your gym clothes near your bed as a reminder, and make friends with someone who likes to work out so that person can keep you accountable.

  1. Practicing self-care

In college, the act of practicing self-care can get a bit hazy. Among the many responsibilities students have, self-care can get lost among the list. Many students make an effort to take care of their bodies. However, mental health should also be taken into consideration. According to a poll done in 2018, maintaining self-care ranked among common New Year’s resolutions of that year.

According to the National Bipolar Association, simple tasks like meditating and taking a bubble bath are great ways to practice self-care.

  1.  Saving money and using it wisely

Another issue many students face is learning how to budget. According to a poll conducted by YouGov, saving money is among the top five New Year’s resolutions made and among the hardest to keep.

“I want to get in shape, reach out to more people and financially become more stable throughout the year,” freshman Jadesola Fashoro said

According to The College Investor, students can save money and use money wisely in many different ways. Building credit and keeping track of restaurant deals so you can save money are two great ways to use your money wisely.

  1.  Procrastinating less

As college students, and as human beings, we all procrastinate. Instead of being productive, we watch one more episode of that new show or go out with friends. Soon, we are staying up all night finishing that assignment we had a week to do.

This, in turn, can tend to stress us out and put us in bad mood. Old habits die hard, and the battle to eliminate procrastination continues for another year. According to Psychology Today, giving yourself a reward and breaking up tasks into small sections helps you avoid procrastination. Another way to procrastinate less is to change up your environment and get a partner to motivate you.

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